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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
warned about acts of terror. >>> major u.s. media report that boeing has developed possible fixes for the battery problems of its dreamliner aircraft. if the fixes work, 787 airliners could be back in the air as early as april. the new boeing 787 fleet was grounded in january after a series of problems occurred with their lithium ion batteries. the "new york times" and the "wall street journal" report that boeing officials plan to propose the fixes to the federal aviation administration as early as friday. the u.s. newspapers say that boeing plans to redesign the arrangement of eight lithium ion batteries -- that's lithium ion cells in each battery -- and add insulation in between them. boeing told the media that the changes could minimize the risk of a short circuit or fire in one of the cells spreading to others. the plane manufacturer also told the media that it plans to put the batteries in new protective cases so that the failure of single cells will not cause fires. the two u.s. newspapers said the faa would not approve the proposed changes immediately. they report that fede
the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in pece talks. waer: thousas ofsraeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railw
. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, d committed to dog real andermane good thworld. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, rdant, and peafuworld. re information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh
concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy
to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and therefore less secure nation. >> i'm to the giving up on democracy. i don't know what the alternative is. if you say a democratic government can't solve this problem, then you are saying we need a dictatorship? i dot think s. >> rose: i'm pleased to have jay fishman at this table for the first time, welcome. >> thank you, charlie s so good to be here. >> rose: so just pick up on overdraft, what's the urgency? and why hasn't the government, washington responded to something that most people agree stands in the way of america's economic growth and health? >> so let me size up the issue in just a few numbers. this discussion has been lots of words, precious few numbers. the baby boom generation of which i'm a member is moving in exorrably into that 65 and older time frame, between 2000 and 2010, 55 to 64, that population group gr
it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary s let justick up wth tat coent from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things togher, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're ging to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- need to fund military personnel. the president exempted military personnel from
these circumstances. aise said, in some cases, that's notoingo be possible. >> woodruff: i is u.s. national security at stake because of what might happen? >> it is, in the following sense-- by the end of the year, as i said, two-third of our army units, active-duty army units and all of our reserve units will not be ready to fight other wars. many of our air force air units will not be ready to fight other wars. a third of our ships in the pacific will not be at sea. it's not becau they-- they're not there. the ips aren't there. it's because we can't afford to operate them because we don't have any money left in the accounts that fund them. and we have to cut account by account by account. that's what sequestration forces us to do. >> woodruff: if this gets resolved secretary carter between now and march 1, or soon thereafter, are will all these cuts go away. >> oh, yes, we would never do any of these things. it's everyone's hope that deals that cover revenues and expenditures which everybody knows is necessary that that deal can be made, if congress can come around with a deal like that that the p
and capital income. and the u.s. is a relatively high capital income taoury. we have about the highest corporate tax on earth. i think guiana and the congo have higher rates. other than that, nobody does. so if we try to drive up the amount of revenue we extract from capital the capital flees and there are no jobs in the u.s. so we have to have a more 21st century appreciation for how economies really work. and if we want to create high-paying jobs for people we need to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in deces. >> cau theyre locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, the investment, the call for the investment in univers
decision on whether to send u.s. troops into pakistan. >> he also knew that if it had gone wrong, there would not only have been dramatically negative consequences for the men he sent in, and for our country's security, but also for his own politics. it very ll could he been a reerndindecion. >> narrator: the president decided to authorize the operation for sunday, may 1. >> i think that was one of the longest days that he's had as president. he said to us at the time that the minutes were feeling like hours, as we waited for the operation to begin. >> narrator: they waited for the signal that bin laden was in the compound. >> admiral mcraven provided the call sign "geronimo kia"-- "killed in action." and at that point, people kind of started to make eye contact and there was this sense of not just relief, but great pride and admiration in what had taken place. and nobody spoke until the president said to everybody around him, "looks like we got him." >> the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> narrator: the killing of o
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)